Chairlift

PopGun Presents

Chairlift

Mr Twin Sister, Empress Of, Slowdance, Jason McMahon, Ice Choir

Dec 17

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

Glasslands Gallery

Brooklyn, NY

$20.00

Sold Out

This event is 21 and over

Chairlift
Chairlift
Caroline Polachek and Patrick Wimberly made Something, their sophomore record, over 18 months between the back of an antique store in Brooklyn and the basement of a family home in Streatham, London. The world and characters of Something, slowly emerged- overtones of manic revenge contrast with a dark brooding guilt (“Sidewalk Safari”, “Amanaemonesia”, “Take it out on Me”, “Guilty as Charged”); pastoral, almost psychedelic love meets its own inevitable, blue future (“Met Before”, “Frigid Spring”, “Turning”, “Cool as a Fire”). In contrast to Chairlift’s debut album’s Does you Inspire You pop-dreamscape, created in the dark, after school and work, the band uncovered the songs on Something in the daytime, drinking coffee. Producer Dan Carey’s studio is part of the world of Something, full of giant plate-reverb boxes, mint green reel-to-reels salvaged from dismantled BBC studios, plastic human heads which are used to record and simulate the listeners location in approximation to the sound. The head was sitting in the back seat of Carey’s car, a microphone on each ear, while Caroline drove, screaming the “I’m gonna hunt you down… I’m gonna run you down” lyric of “Sidewalk Safari”. Perhaps this incident lends itself to the fact that Something recalls the anthemic driving albums of the mid-90’s (Weezer’s ‘Blue’ album comes to mind). Larry Fitzmaurice (Pitchfork) says that ”...Chairlift go for ‘big’ – like, really big – and succeed on every level”.
Mr Twin Sister
Mr Twin Sister
“Twin Sister are a Brooklyn-by-way-of-Long Island quintet that do so much so well. Their songs have a remarkable sense of atmosphere and romanticism. They nod at their heroes-- maybe Stereolab and Bjork, maybe Cocteau Twins or 1980s pop-- without overtly stealing. They seem to know they are capable of great things...” - Pitchfork
The band's self-titled album is the second full length album by the five members of Twin Sister, now known as Mr Twin Sister. Following their debut LP, composed largely in a studio, the band returned to the creative process they had employed on their first two EPs- working individually or in small, shifting groups. Ideas germinated in an environment where experimentation was encouraged. Some bloomed immediately, others matured slowly over the years, the rest demolished and rebuilt dozens of times in an effort to discover their ideal form. Progress was slow, coming in fits and bursts, accommodating the unexpected twists and turns of life.

There was a new depth to the process as well- prior to 2010, when working on their EPs in much the same manner, the band had never before been in a proper studio. Now having spent time in one, they knew better how and when to use it, and were able to combine its benefits with a more methodical songwriting approach for the first time.

We are left with eight songs stretching 38 minutes, something far deeper, darker, and more substantial than anything they have done before. Revolving around themes of self-identity and isolation, the songs stand as a testament to fighting for what you love, breaking down the walls we surround ourselves with, out of the dark and into the light.
Empress Of
Empress Of
Lorely Rodriguez, the artist known as Empress Of, recorded her new album, Us, all over
Southern California. Topanga Canyon. Ojai. At a recording studio “with no windows.” At her
home in Highland Park. At another recording studio “with a really loud cricket.” “He was there,
like, all month,” she says, “And I was trying to track vocal tracks and he’d be like, CHIRP,
CHIRP!”
It was the first time she tried to record music this way—sequestered, for a month at a time, in
between touring and performing, alone but for the company of a cricket. She would later invite
collaborators—Dev Hynes (aka Blood Orange), LA production duo Sam Griesemer and Jerome
Potter of DJDS, Spanish electronic producer Pional—but the resulting project remains a
showcase of Rodriguez’ skill both as a lyricist and a producer, though she is wont to admit it.
The artist is modest about her skills as a instrumentalist (“Lorely plays every instrument half-
assed,” she says, “Put that in the bio.”) and coy about her process as a writer (“I don’t write out
chords for my songs. Everything is intuitive in production. I don’t have one piece of sheet music
for my songs.”)
She estimates that she’s produced about 75 percent of this album, which serves as the real
testament to her dynamism as a musician, since she won’t testify to it herself. She’s frustrated
with a media preoccupation on her jazz music education, but only because she believes her
experiences singing to Céline Dion and Mariah Carey in the living room of her childhood home
in Southern California are far more formative. When pressed about her influences, she lists her
mother.  
Empress Of’s debut album Me was released almost three years ago, in 2015. As the name
suggests, it presented a deeply personal exploration of her emotional world. So personal, she
says, it was difficult to perform. “It was, like, every day, just giving myself to the audience,” she
says. With Us, Rodriguez wanted to facilitate a more equal exchange of energy between herself
and her listeners, to create a “community.” “It’s not just love songs. It’s about different
experiences of the heart,” she says. “I want it to be like a mirror, and [the audience] sees a little
bit of themselves in every song.”
Slowdance
Slowdance
Slowdance bring keyboard and guitar and a rhythm section that can flip from a new wave throb to a spaghetti western rumble as easily as it delivers punchy indie-pop, all anchored by vocalist Quay Quinn-Settel’s demure cheek and soprano dramatics. She recalled France Gall, and they did Stereolab, because language still counts (even the set-closing cover of New Order’s “Consent” was not without its tie to France). Says Quinn-Settel: “I learned how to read in French before learning in English. It’s half of me, it wouldn’t feel right to sing in English alone. Plus the way the language shapes the mouth changes the timber of my voice, so it’s nice to have both.”
Ice Choir
Ice Choir
Somewhere, amongst abstract romantic lyricism and pointilized synthesizer pastiche, THE ICE CHOIR proposes to you, the listener, a most unfavorable “pop” experience: imaginative songcraft minus the cool factor. Leaning heavily on the crumbling pillars of 1980’s technopop production aesthetic, this is music that is both distinctly modern in composition and cripplingly esoteric. Waylaying melodies to mislead and seduce. Sentiments both saccharine and surreal.
Formless constructs playing you out of THAT weird dream and into your cold reality.
Venue Information:
Glasslands Gallery
289 Kent Avenue
Brooklyn, NY, 11249
http://www.theglasslands.com/