pronoun

pronoun

Future Generations, Cape Francis, Frances Cone

Dec 10

6:00 pm

Elsewhere - Zone One

Brooklyn, NY

$12 / $15

This event is 16 and over

pronoun
pronoun
"It's a heartbroken girl in her shitty apartment in Brooklyn," Alyse Vellturo, aka pronoun, says of her Rhyme & Reason debut There's no one new around you. Recorded in solitude in a cramped corner of the artist's bedroom, the four-song EP is both personally charged and sonically inventive, matching richly layered guitar textures and insistent lo-fi beats with vivid, uncompromisingly personal lyrics.

"It was literally just me in the corner with my little computer, recording guitar through a tiny practice amp through the headphone jack," she explains. "Every night after work I'd go home, buy a six pack, and sit at my computer with my electric guitar. Once I felt the song had its bones I would go have a cigarette in my backyard, write a verse, go in and record the verse, go out for another cigarette, write a second verse, etc. All the verses are written in about three minutes."

The Boston native and self-confessed emo kid began playing guitar and recording her own compositions in her early teens. While studying at Boston's prestigious Berklee College of Music, she gained technical experience producing and engineering friends' recording projects and turning her attention towards the business side of the music industry. In 2012, she moved to Brooklyn to take a music-biz job, putting her own creative efforts on temporary hold. Eventually, she felt the urge to write and record music again, and her renewed creative spark gained additional momentum in December 2015, when a three-year relationship abruptly ended.

"I started to write songs and record again, but I didn't have much to write about," she recalls. "Then we broke up, and it all came pouring out. The tracks on this EP are all from that period. The whole thing was done in three or four weeks, every night after work. It was an instinctive process, and it kind of grew on its own."

Vellturo adopted the performing pseudonym of pronoun, in acknowledgement of her status as a one-person band. "I want to keep it that way, at least for now," she says. "This music is so personal to me, and it's kind of hard to do that with other people. I have done some gigs with a drummer, a bass player and a guitarist, and I have a vocal pedal that does harmonies with me, so it kind of sounds like the record.

"pronoun is almost like another persona, someone that says and words things in a way I never would," Vellturo concludes. "I don't usually express my emotions outwardly. Sometimes a song will come together in a few hours in my apartment, and I'll wake up the next morning and listen to it and think 'How did I write that?,' because I wasn't aware that I was thinking that. So pronoun is something that I'd like to keep exploring for awhile."
Future Generations
Future Generations
It's fair to say Future Generations' music contradicts the assumption that music always reflects the objective time and space in which its creators operate. When penning lyrics at Fordham University, songwriter/singer Eddie Gore shirked references to collegiate lawns, Jesuit lineage and other specific milieu of college life. Instead, he wrote tender refrains to an introverted struggle with finding individual meaning in an infinitely vast world (moving to New York City from Nashville will do that to you) and sharing those anxieties with loved ones.

"For me college was not so much about learning a specific trade or skill. It was more about discovering who I want to be and learning about life in general," says Eddie. "I'm from the south. I'm from Nashville. It's not a small town, but it's not New York. That's why a lot of my lyrics are about bigger things, kind of "life" questions."

By the time graduation rolled around in the spring of 2015, Future Generations expanded to include bassist and fellow Fordham graduate Devon Sheridan, along with original members Mike Sansevere and Eric Grossman. With school in the rearview mirror, Future Generations spent its first few post-college months in Eli Janney's (Boys Against Girls) Brooklyn studio, finishing a full-length record. Along with two tracks from the 2014 EP, "Polysun," the band recorded eight new tunes for the eponymous debut.

On Future Generations, which was produced by Claudius Mittendorfer (Temples, Neon Indian), Eddie's lyrical transfixions reveal an eagerness to burst forth from the confines of collegiate ennui, still pondering the same existential quandaries that unfailingly tend catch his imagination. And the fuel for his escape comes from a formulaic synthesis of soaring guitar hooks and pulsing synths. It's the melody that usually comes first, and the group has happily relied on that recipe for almost five years.

"With "Stars," I had a reaction (to the music) that wasn't about one particular thing, it was about discovering something broad about yourself," says Eddie. "You have people who come along with you and people who don't. The melody made me feel that."

As a result, Future Generations flaunts an ambitiously large scope for a band used to writing and recording in the cramped confines of college dormitories and email chains. While continuing to grow, the band added a fifth member, drummer Dylan Wells, and four of the five moved into an apartment near Prospect Park. The quintet toured the Midwest this fall with Savoir Adore and will continue to tour in support of the debut album in 2017.
Cape Francis
Cape Francis
Cape Francis is a new project by singer-songwriter Kevin Olken Henthorn (former lead singer of Stone Cold Fox). The project formed out of the collapse of a four-year indie pop rock band. Tired of heavy genre constrictions, Henthorn started Cape Francis looking to break away from traditional indie rock songwriting. Rooted in finger picked guitar, grounded by percussion and toms, and glued together by synth pads and hooks, the songs find a home somewhere in between folk and post-rock.
Frances Cone
Frances Cone
Hailing from the low-country of Charleston, SC to the top of New York state, now Brooklyn-based Frances Cone, creates an indie pop that harkens back to old time folk and blues. With rich harmonies, soulful, smoky vocals, and lyrics that both comfort and challenge, the band subverts tradition to live in a world of delicate sensibilities and mesmerizing heartbreak, reaching a place that sings you through the ups and the downs, remarking on the heavy while lightening the load. Their influences have an incredible range - from Rufus Wainwright to Local Natives, Feist to Fleetwood Mac - and they are not easily categorizable, making their voices heard loud and clear in what can be a very crowded scene. Fronted by Frances Cone, she is joined onstage by Jeff Malinowski, Andrew Doherty, and Aaron Shafer-Haiss. Already acclaimed by the likes of Vanity Fair, American Songwriter, Paste and Brooklyn Vegan, their reach is proving far and wide, their authenticity and captivating melodies undeniable.
Venue Information:
Elsewhere - Zone One
599 Johnson Ave.
Brooklyn, NY, 11237
http://www.elsewherebrooklyn.com/